The Kodak Roll Holders

The roll holder were introduced by Kodak since 1886 and placed in 1898 as retro-fitting operation to try to ensure buyers of cameras produced by the company in previous years the opportunity to work with the new films in roll; from Kodak catalogue (1886), the system could be applied to any camera to replace the original glass film holder or portalastra. The Kodak roll holders contain negative material wound on spool can guarantee a range up to 24 poses and…

35 (00) format

Historical Background The 35 (00) format is not well known even if we can consider it as the predecessor of the135 roll; the format was introduced in 1916 as a culmination of Kodak’s efforts in the progressive size reduction equipment for the benefit of a increasingly crowd of amateur photographers. The camera that accompanied the market introduction of the film still represents one of the smallest cameras ever produced by Kodak (and, certainly, the smallest box camera at all). These…

105 format

Historical Notes In 1898, booming out to the masses of photography Kodak introduced its first folding camera: the Folding Pocket Kodak was designed to produce images in a format very close to today’s 6×9 (5.5 x8 cm) . Looking at the “pocket” included in the name, you can imagine what was the spirit that had led to the design and implementation of this new type of camera. In addition to the new model was introduced, as was customary in those…

117 Format

Historical Notes In 1900 Kodak introduced the first camera with the Brownie name, the No. 1 and, as always, associated with it a newroll film format , later encoded with the number 117. It is a format that has remained, at least under that name rather not widespread, given the great harvest of news and developments in the field that were recorded at that time. The 117 format remained in production until 1949 with an average spread only in the United States.…