Found films-part II

kodak Ektachrome old

A new roundup of found films … Found film # 3: Kodachrome 135 This is not properly a found film because the box was found with slides that were already been processed and framed but, these slides allows you to understand at least part of the reason for the veneration that many photographers have had for decades to Kodachrome. The box has the postage stamp of the laboratory which dates back to 1951 and cardboard frames seem to match those…

Found films

One of the most pleasant surprises that you may have when buying a used camera is to find inside a film exposed but not developed; Obviously, the more the camera was aged more the thing becomes interesting. My passion for the films was created initially by browsing this site which lists hundreds of photos literally recovered from oblivion. Over time I have come across several times in films and tried to establish a development method that could guarantee reliable results…

Miniature Photography – Part II

Following the first notes on miniature photography in which we had a look at the film formats, we shall now proceed to make a quick trip on the main cameras available on the market at the time; several of these, in particular the Minolta 16, are still readily available in second-hand equipment market and can be used without any problems, except that of refilling the cartridge , even today. Minolta 16 The small Minolta 16 in its many variations is…

Miniature Photography – Part I

Reducing the size of the picture frame and subsequentially of the camera  is a requirement that has accompanied the evolution of photography from its beginnings up to digital era: the splitting of original deguerreotype sheet sizes (up to sixteenths), the improvement of field cameras up introduction of roll films, all of these steps were completed, according to the standards of their time, in the same direction. A format such as 4×5, which we now consider “Large”, was in early years…